John (Wynslow) Winslow

b. 26 Apr 1597-Drotwich, England d. Bet 22 Mar/31 May 1674-Boston, MA

Mary Chilton

Mayflower Passenger

b. 30 May 1607-Sandwich, Kent, England d. 1 May 1679-Boston, MA



Their Family:

01. WINSLOW, John

02. WINSLOW, Susanna b. Bef 1630

03. WINSLOW, Mary

04. WINSLOW, Edward

05. WINSLOW, Sarah

06. WINSLOW, Samuel

07. WINSLOW, Joseph

08. WINSLOW, Isaac

09. WINSLOW, Unnamed

10. WINSLOW, Benjamin

Notes:

John Winslow:
From Pilgrim Hall Museum - America's Museum of Pilgrim Possessions

John Winslow was born at Droitwich, England, in 1597. His brothers, Edward and Gilbert, had been passengers on the Mayflower, arriving in Plymouth in 1620. John Winslow was a passenger on the Fortune, arriving in 1621. Two other Winslow brothers, Kenelm and Josiah, also settled in New England, arriving before 1632.

John Winslow married Mayflower passenger Mary Chilton sometime before the 1627 Division of Cattle, when their names appear together.

John and Mary Winslow had ten children : John, Susanna, Mary, Edward, Sarah, Samuel, Joseph, Isaac, an unnamed child who died young, and Benjamin. The youngest of these, Benjamin, is the only child whose birth is listed in the Records of Plymouth Colony.

Sometime after the birth of Benjamin, James and Mary Chilton Winslow moved to Boston. The place of their first residence is not known. On the 16th of June, 1671, John and Mary transferred their church membership from Plymouth to the Third Church in Boston (Third Church is now called Old South Church; the present Old South Meeting House was built about 50 years after Mary Chilton's death).

On the 19th of September, 1671, John Winslow bought, for the sum of 500 pounds in New England silver money, "the Mansion or dwelling-house of the Late Antipas Voice with the gardens wood-yard and Backside as it is scituate lying and being in Boston aforesaid as it is nowe fenced in And is fronting & Facing to the Lane going to mr John Jolliffes." The Winslows lived in this house until the death of John Winslow in 1674 and Mary Chilton Winslow in 1679. The house (which would have been on Spring Lane) no longer exists.

At the time of his death, John Winslow was one of the wealthiest merchants in Boston.

The Last Will and Testament of John Winslow
"In the name of god Amen the twelveth day of March in the yeare of our Lord according to the Computacon of the Church of England one thousand six hundred and seaventy and three AnnoRegni Regis Car: Secundi Anglia &xxji I John Winslow Senr of Boston in the countie of Suffolke in New England Merchant being weake of Body but of Sound and perfect memory praysed be Almighty God for the same Knowing the uncertainetyof this prsent life and being desirous to settle that outward Estate that the lord hath lent me I doe make this my last Will and testament in manner and forme following (that is to say) ffirst and principally I comend my soule to almighty God my Creator hopeing to receive full pardon and remission of all my sins and salvation through the merritts of Jesus Christ my Creator hopeing to receive full pardon and remission of all my sins and salvation through the merritts of Jesus Christ my Redeemer : And my body to the Earth to be decently buryed with such charges as to the Overseers of this my last Will and Testament hereafter named shall be thought meet and convenient And as touching such worldly Estate as the lord hath Lent me my Will and meaneing is the same shall be imployed and bestowed as hereafter in and by this my Will is Exprest - "Imprimis I Doe revoake renounce and make voice all Wills by formerly made and declaire & appoint this my last Will and Testament: "Item I Will that all the Debts that I justly owe at the time of my decease to any person or persons whatsoever shall be well and truly contented and paid in convenient time after my decease by my Executor or overseers hereafter named. Item I give and bequeath unto my Deare and well beloved wife Mary Winslow the use of my now dwelling house with the gardens and yards thereunto belonging for and during the tearme of her naturall life Item I give and bequeath unto my said wife the use of all myhousehould good for her to dispose of as she shall thinke meet Item I give unto my said wife the sume of ffoure hundred pounds in lawfull mony of New England to be paid unto her by my Executor or Overseers hereafter named in convenient time after my decease: Item after the death of my said wife I give and bequeath my said dwelling house with all the Land belonging to the same unto my sone John Winslow and to his heires to ever he or they paying when they come to possesse & enjoy the same the sume of ffifty pounds of Lawfull mony of new England unto william Payne the sone of my Daughter Sarah Meddlecott - And also to parnell Winslow Daughter to my Son Isaack Winslow the full sume of ffifty pounds of like Lawfull mony; and my will is that both the said sums be paid into the hands of my Overseers to be improved for them untill they come to age or the day of Marriage with the full profitt that they make of the same and in case either of the said Chldren dye before they come of age or to marriage as afforesaid: My will is that the survivor of them shall then enjoy both the said sums: But in case both of them should dye before they come to age: My Will is that then the said sums shall be Equally divided amongst the Daughters of my Daughter Latham to be paid unto them as they come to age or marriage as afforesaid Item my will is that my Katch Speedwell (whereof I am the sole owner) and the produce of the cargo that I sent out in her : be (at her return to Boston) disposed of by my Overseers hereafter named and the neate produce thereof be Equally divided amongst my Childen my sone John Winslow onely Excepted and to have no part thereof : Item I give and bequeath unto my sone Benjamin the full sume of one hundred pounds to be paid him by my Executor or overseers hereafter named when he shall attaine the Age of twenty one yeares Item my Will is that if my sone Edward Winslow shall see cause to relinquish his sd part and intrest in the sd katch Speedwell and her proceeds : then my Will is that he shall have one quarter part of my Katch John’s Adventure unto his owne proper use : And then the said Katch and Cargo to be Equally divided among my other Children : my son John Excepted as afforesaid together with my sone Edward from having any part in the afforesaid Katch or Cargo item I give and bequeath unto my grandchild Susanna Latham the sume of thirty pounds in mony to be paid her at the day of her marriage And to the rest of my Daughter Latham's Children I give and bequeath unto Each of them five pound pr peece to be paid unto them as they shall come to age or the day of marriage Item I give and bequeath unto my sone Edward Winslows Children the sume of five pounds pr peece to be paid unto them as they shall come to age or the day of Marriage Item I give and bequeath unto my sone Edward Grey his children that he had by my Daughter Mary Grey the sume of twenty pounds pr peece to be paid unto them when they come to age or the day of their respective marriages Item I give unto my sone Joseph Winslow’s two Children five pounds pr peece to be paid unto them as afforesaid Item I give unto my Grandchild Mercy Harris her two Children five pounds apeece to be paid unto them as afforesaid Item I give and bequeath unto my Kinsman Josiah Winslow now Governor of New Plimoth the sume of twenty pounds to be paid unto him by my overseers in Goods : Item I give unto my Brother Josiah Winslow the sume of twenty pounds to be paid unto him by my overseers in Goods : both in convenient time after my decease Item I give unto my kinswoman Eleanor Baker the Daughter of my Brother Kenelm Winslow five pounds to be paid her in goods by my overseers in convenient time after my decease Item my will is that what my Estate shall amount unto more then will pay funerall Charges My Debts and Legacyes in this my will give and bequeathed it shall be divided (after the Decease of my said wife) among my seaven Children in Equall proportions Except any one of my said children shall have any Extraordinary providence befall them by way of any Eminent Losse then that part of my Estate that shall remaine as afforesaid shall be divided & distributed according to the prudence and discression of my overseers hereafter named or any two of them : Item my will is that in case any of my now children shall dye before my said wife that then his or their proportion of the said remaineing Estate shall be disposed to his or their Children if they have any: if not, then that part or parts shall be equally divided amongst the survivors of my said Chldren : Item I give to Mr Paddyes widdow five pounds as a token of my love Item my will is that my Negro Girle Jane (after she hath served twenty yeares from the date hereof) shall be free : and that she shall service my wife during her life and after my wifes decease she shall be disposed of according to the discression of my overseers hereafter named or any two of them : Item I doe nominate and appoint my sone John Winslow the sole Executor of this my last Will and testament. Item I doe hereby nominate & appoint my loveing ffriends Mr Thomas Brattle Mr William Tailer and Mr John Winsley my Overseers to see this my will performed so farr as they can : And I doe hereby give unto my said Overseers five pounds apeece in mony as a token of my love Item my will is that my said Overseers or any two of them shall & hereby have full power to make saile of any part of any of my vessell or vessells that I have not hereby disposed of : And also any other goods wares and merchandize for the best advantage of my afforesaid Children : And better paymt of other Legacyes by me hereby given & bequeathed : Item my will is that during the absence of my said Executor my Overseers above named or any two of them have full power to act in all matters and things resspecting this my will as if he was personally prsent : And farther my Will is that my said Executor shall not act in any matter or thing respecting this my will with out the advice and consent of my said overseers or two of them And that my executor shall not under any pretence whatsoever claime any more of my estate then I have hereby bequeathed him In Witnesse whereof I the said John winslow Senr have hereunto set my hand & seale the day and yeare first above written John Winslow Signed sealed & published by John Winslow Senr as his last will & Textamt in the prsence of us - John Joyliffe, John Hayward ser"
The inventory of the goods of John Winslow, deceased 1674
Impr The Household stuff in ye house in sundry things Apprised wth his wareing apparell Att 200 00 00
In new England money 500 00 00
In peeces of Eight 500 1/2 peeces 133 09 04
6 french Crownes at 001 10 00
Eleven Crosse Dollers at 5s 6d pr peece 003 00 06
In English money 003 03 00
2 Barrills of porke 004 19 00
Money Received of Captaine Curwin 005 04 00
Money Received of mr John Richards 012 10 00
Money Received for canvas 010 01 00
two Butts & halfe of sugar sold 032 18 06
Money Received of James Andrews 001 17 04
Money Received of Steephen Hescott 017 18 00
Produce of the Ketch Speedwell with her Cargo Charges Deducted 330 00 00
the produce of the Barke Mary & part of her Cargo Beinge sold the Charges beinge Deducted 209 00 00
To a parcell of Goods Received pr Elias Parkman from England sold & with the Advance Amounts to 145 00 00
To a quarter part of the pinke Jane & Sarah sold for 110 00 00
To another quarter of Ditto Ketch given to mr Edward winslow vallued at 110 00 00
To a hogshead of sugar Came from Nevis vallued Att 006 00 00
To 6 hogsheads of tobacco sold for 032 17 06
To a parcell of leafe & Role robacco unsold vallued att 040 00 00
To old England goods unsold vallued Att 004 00 00
To the Dwellinge house Garden & land Adjoyninge to itt 450 00 00
To cash due from the tresures as pr mr John Richard Receit 012 10 00
To money Due from Nathaniel fryer pr Bill 032 10 00
Due from Nathaniell Winslow pr booke 004 05 00
Due from Goodwife farnam 003 08 00
Due from Goodwife Pearce pr books 001 18 02
Due from Job WInslow pr books 004 17 06
Due from Nathaniell Walker pr books 008 18 00
Due from mr Joseph Roche 200 00 00
Due from mr Richard Patishall Above 009 00 00
The whole summe is two thousand nine hundred forty six pounds fourteen shillings tenn pence 2946 14 10

Event 1: April 18, 1597, Christened, St. Peter's, Droitwich, Worcester, England
Event 2: Traveled to Leyden, Holland where he joined the Puritan movement
Event 3: 1620, Began the voyage with the "Mayflower" fleet on the, forced to abandon voyage when the "Speedwell" was found unseaworthy
Fact 4: 1621, Emigrated to New World on the "Fortune"
Fact 5: 1656, Moved to Boston, became a shipping merchant
Occupation: Shipping Merchant, Purchaser
Personality/Intrst: Born on a Saturday
Residence: Worchester, England, Holland, Plymouth, & Boston Massachusetts
Ethnicity/ Religion: Puritan
Comment 1: March 12, 1673/74, Dated his will, died one of the wealthiest men in Boston
Comment 2: Presumably educated in England
Comment 3: June 3, 1652, Deputy to Plymouth General Court, but didn't hold many public offices
Comment 4: April 6, 1653, Sat on the Council of War

Mary Chilton:
Mary arrived in Plymouth on the Mayflower in 1620, accompanying her mother and father James Chilton. Mary’s father died while the Mayflower was anchored in Provincetown Harbor. Her mother died shortly thereafter. For more information on Mary Chilton’s parents, including information on their English and Dutch background, read the biography of James Chilton . A Chilton family tradition, first recorded in 1744, has the 12-year-old Mary Chilton as the first woman ashore at Plymouth. There is no contemporary recording of the event, but there are also no competing claims. Mary Chilton’s landing on Plymouth Rock has been celebrated in story and in art. The Landing of the Pilgrims, painted in 1877 by Henry Bacon and showing Mary Chilton landing on Plymouth Rock, is on exhibit at Pilgrim Hall Museum (click HERE to view that painting). Mary Chilton married John Winslow, a passenger on the Fortune (arrival in 1621). John Winslow’s brothers Edward and Gilbert had been passengers on the Mayflower. John Winslow was born in 1597. John Winslow and Mary Chilton were married sometime before 1627. John and Mary Winslow had 10 children : John, Susanna, Mary, Edward, Sarah, Samuel, Joseph, Isaac, an unnamed child who died young, and Benjamin. The youngest of these, Benjamin, is the only child whose birth is listed in the Plymouth Colony Records : "1653. Plymouth Regester of the Beirth of theire Children… Beniamine, the sonne of Mr John Winslow, born the 12th day of August." Plymouth Colony Records, Vol. 8, p. 15. Sometime after the birth of Benjamin, James and Mary Chilton Winslow moved to Boston. The place of their first residence is not known. On the 16th of June, 1671, John and Mary Chilton Winslow transferred their church membership from Plymouth to the Third Church in Boston (Third Church is now called the Old South Church; the present Old South Meeting House was built about 50 years after Mary Chilton’s death). On the 19th of September, 1671, John Winslow bought, for the sum of L500 in New England silver money, "the Mansion or dwelling-house of the Late Antipas Voice with the gardens wood-yard and Backside as it is scituate lying and being in Boston aforesaid as it is nowe fenced in And is fronting & Facing to the Lane going to mr John Jolliffes." The house, on today’s Spring Lane, no longer exists. John Winslow died in 1674. Click HERE for additional biographical information on John Winslow. Click HERE for John Winslow’s last will and testament and an inventory of his estate taken at the time of his death in 1674. Mary Chilton Winslow died in 1679. Click HERE for Mary Chilton Winslow’s last will and testament, and an inventory of her estate taken at the time of her death in 1679. The Winslows may be buried in the old Winslow Tomb in King’s Chapel Burying Ground, Boston.

Event 1: May 31, 1607, Christened, St. Peter's, Sandwich, Kent, England
Event 2: 1620, First female to touch foot on Plymouth Rock, Plymouth, Massachusetts
Event 3: 1620-1621, Orphaned at age 13 in Plymouth
Fact 4: Aft. 1621, Sheltered with Miles Standish & John Alden
Fact 5: 1650, Moved to Boston with husband & family

Occupation: Homemaker
Residence: England, Holland, Massachusetts
Ethnicity/ Religion: Separatist
Mary had 9 children - The Mayflower Descentdants Vol. 1, page 14
Comment 1: July 31, 1676, Will was dated, Valued at L212 11s. 9d
(MF5G Chilton, More & Rogers II) Mary2 Chilton was the daughter of JAMES, prob. of Canterbury. James died in the Cape Cod Harbor, and his wife d. in Plymouth shortly after. Mary's sister Isabella who married Roger Chandler, and who came over later, is the only of his other children known to have come to the colony.
Mary died at Boston, shortly before 11 May, 1679. She married, at Plymouth, between July, 1623, and 1 June, 1627, John Winslow, who was bp. at Droitwich, Worcestershire, England, 18 April, 1597, came on the Fortune, and died at Boston, between 12 March and 21 May, 1673/4. They removed to Boston before 1660.
Mary and John had ten children, and their last child was born at Plymouth in 1653. A few years later they removed to Boston. (MD 27:1:4) On the 16th of July, 1671, John and Mary (Chilton) Winslow transferred their church membership from Plymouth to the Third Church, now the Old South Church in Boston, and we find by the Suffolk County Deeds that two months later, on the 19th of September, 1671, John Winslow bought, for the sum of £500 in New England silver money, "the Mansion or dwelling-house of the Late Antipas Boice with the gardens wood-yard and Backside as it is scituate lying and being in Boston aforesaid as it is nowe fenced in And is fronting & Facing to the Lane going to mr John Jolliffes".
Here John and Mary Winslow continued to reside until the death of John Winslow in 1673/4, and here died Mary (Chilton) Winslow five years later.
Literally Transcribed By George Ernest Bowman [MD 1.2.65+]
"The original will of Mary (Chilton) Winslow is still preserved in the files of the Suffolk County Registry of Probate, at Boston, together with the bond of the administrators, signed by her son John Winslow and son-in-law Richard Middlecott. They were recorded in Vol. VI, pages 302 and 301, of the Probate Records. The will was written on one side of a sheet of paper a little over eighteen by fourteen inches in size, and, as will be seen by the reproduction, is in excellent condition, except in some of the creases made by folding. As William Tailer, the executor named in the will, came into court on the first of May and refused to serve, it is certain that Mary (Chilton) Winslow died before May, 1679, and probably only a short time before.

The original inventory is missing, and the copy has been made from Vol. XII, pp. 314, 315, of the Probate Records. The copies of the will and bond were made from the original documents."

Mary Chilton Winslow Will
In the name of God Amen the thirty first day of July in the yeare of our Lord one thousand Six hundred seventy and Six I Mary Winslow of Boston in New England Widdow being weake of Body but of Sound and perfect memory praysed be almighty God for the same Knowing the uncertainety of this present life and being desirous to settle that outward Estate the Lord hath Lent me. I doe make this my last Will and Testamt in manner and forme following (that is to say)

First and principally I comend my Soule into the hands of Almighty God my Creator hopeing to receive full pardon and remission of all my sins; and Salvation through the alone merrits of Jesus Christ my redeemer: And my body to the Earth to be buried in Such Decent manner as to my Executor hereafter named shall be thought meet and convenient and as touching such worldly Estate as the Lord hath Lent me my Will and meaneing is the same shall be imployed and bestowed as hereafter in and by this my Will is Exprest.

Imps I doe hereby revoake renounce and make voide all Wills by me formerly made and declaire and apoint this my Last Will and Testamt Item I will that all the Debts that I Justly owe to any manner of person or persons whatsoever shall be well and truely paid or ordained to be paid in convenient time after my decease by my Executor hereafter named —

Item I give and bequeath unto my Sone John Winslow my great Square table Item I give and bequeath unto my Daughter Sarah Middlecott my Best" owne and Pettecoat and my Silver beare bowle and to each of her children a Silver Cup with an handle: Also I give unto my grandchild William Paine my Great silver tankard: Item I give unto my Daughter Susanna Latham my long Table: Six Joyned Stooles and my great Cupboard: a bedstead Bedd and furniture there unto belonging that is in the Chamber over the roome where I now Lye; my small silver Tankard: Six Silver Spoones, a case of Bottles with all my wearing apparell: (except onely what I have hereby bequeathed unto my Daughter Mddlecott & my Grandchild Susanna Latham :) Item I give and bequeath unto my Grandchild Ann Gray that trunke of Linning that I have already delivered to her and is in her possession and also one Bedstead, Bedd Boulster and Pillows that are in the Chamber over the Hall: Also the sume of ten pounds in mony to be paid unto her within Six months next after my decease: Also my will is that my Executor shall pay foure pounds in mony pr ann for three yeares unto Mrs Tappin out of the Intrest of my mony now in Goodman Cleares hands for and towards the maintenance of the said Ann Gray according to my agreemt with Mrs Tappin: Item I give and bequeath unto Mary Winslow Daughter of my sone Edward Winslow my largest Silver Cupp with two handles: and unto Sarah Daughter of the said Edward my lesser Silver cupp with two handles: Also I give unto my Said Sone Edwards Children Six Silver Spoones to be divided between them: Item I give and bequeath unto my grandchild Parnell Winslow the Sume of five pounds in mony to be improved by my Executor untill he come of age: and then paid unto him with the improvemt Item I give & bequeath unto My grandchild Chilton Latham the sum of five pounds in mony to be improved for him untill he come of Age and then paid to him with the improvemt Item my will is that the rest of my spoones be divided among my grandchildren according to the discression of My Daughter Middlecott: Item I give unto my Grandchild Mercy Harris my White Rugg: Item I give unto my Grandchild Mary Pollard forty shillings in mony. Item I give unto my grandchild Susanna Latham my Petty Cate with the silke Lace: Item I give unto Mary Winslow Daughter of my Sone Joseph Winslow the Sume of twenty pounds in mony to be paid out of the sume my said Sone Joseph now owes to be improved by my Executor for the said Mary and paid unto her when She Shall attaine the Age of eighteene yeares or day of Marriage which of them shall first happen Item I give and bequeath the full remainder of my Estate whatsoever it is or wheresoever it may be found unto my children Namely John Winslow Edward Winslow Joseph Winslow Samuell Winslow: Susanna Latham and Sarah Middlecott to be equally divided betweene them Item I doe hereby nominate constitute authorize and appoint my trusty friend Mr William Tailer of Boston aforesd merchant the Sole Executor of this my last Will and testamt: In Witness whereof the said Mary Winslow have hereunto set my hand and Seale the daye and yeare first above written Memorandum I do hereby also Give and bequeath unto Mr Thomas Thacher paster of the third Church in Boston the Sume of five pounds in mony to be pd convenient time after my decease by my Executr Mary Winslow M her marke (Seal)

Signed Sealed and Published by the above named Mary Winslow as her Last Will & testamt in the presence of us after the adding of foure lines as part of her will
John Lands
Ffrancis H Hacker her marke
John Hayward scr
Mr Wm Tailer nominatd. Execr appeared in Court pro May: 1679 and renounced his Executorship. to this will. attests. Jsa: Addington Cler. Jno Hayward and John Lands made oath before the Honorble. Simon Bradstreet Esqr Govr and Edwd. Tyng Esqr Assist. 11th July 1679 that they did see mrs. Mary Winslow Signe and Seale and heard her publish this Instrumt to bee her last will and that then Shee was of disposeing minde to their best understanding.

attests. Jsa: Addington Cler.
24º July Anno: 1679.

present.
Simon Bradstreet Esqr. Govr. }
Edw. Tyng Esqr. }
Joseph Dudley Esqr. } Assists
Humphry Davie Esqr. }
By the Honorble. Governor. and magistrates then met in Boston. power of Admcon of all and singular the goods Estate and Credits of mrs Mary Winslow late of Boston Widdow deced intestate is granted unto John Winslow and Richard Middlecott Merchts two of her sons in behalfe of themslves and others concerned they giving Security to Administer the sd Estate according to law and the declared minde of the deced annext and bringing in an Invento thereof upon Oath as attests.
Jsa: Addington Cler.
(Bond of Administrators.)
Know all men by these presents that wee John Winslow Richard Middlecott & Elisha Hutchinson all of Boston in New-England merchts are holden and stand firmly bound and obliged unto Edward Tyng Esqr Treasuror for the County of Suffolke in the Sume of ffour hundred pounds To bee paid unto the sd Treasuror his Successors in sd Office or Assignes in currant money of New-England To the true payment whereof wee do binde our Selves our heires Execrs Admrs and every of them jointly and severally firmly by these presents. Sealed with our Seales Dated in Boston this 26o July. 1679.

The Condition of this present Obligation is such that if the above bound John Winslow and Richard Middlecott do weld and truly Administer all and singular the Estate of their late mother mrs Mary Winslow Widdow deced intestate according to Law and the declared minde of the deced and shalbee accountable and responsable for the same unto the County Court for Suffolke when called thereunto then this Obligation to bee void and of no Effect or else to remain in full force and Virtue.
Signed Sealed & Delivd. John Winslow
in presence of Richard Middlecott
Jsa: Addington Cler. Elisha Hutchinson

Inventory
Wee whose names are here Underwritten, being desired by mr John Winslow and mr Richard Middlecott, do apprize the Estate of mrs Mary Winslow of Boston. deced as followeth. July. 29th. 1679
£ s d
.To .1. Silver beer Boule. 3£. Two Silver Cups 4£.10 7 10—
To. 1. small Silver Tankard at 4£ .10. twelve Silver Spoons .6£ 10 10
To. 1. silver caudle Cup with two eares 2 18 —
To .1. small silver Cup at . 10s . one case wth 9bottles 12s. 12 —
To .1. silke gowne and petticoate at 6 10—
To .1. gowne .6. petticoates .1: pair. body's 1.mantle .1. pair Stockins 3 15 —
To .1. Bed and boulster with fflocks and ffeathers 1 10—
To .1. close bedsteed .2. coverlits & .2. oldblankets .1. old Rugg .l. boulster .3. pillows& . 1. pr, curtains & vallents 4— —
To .2. Leather Chaires at 10s. one ffeather Bedat 4£ .5 4 15 —
To: 11. old Sheets. at .35s. one diaper TableCloth . 10s 2 5 —
To .3. old ffustian . wastcoats at — 7 6
To .22. old Napkins .7s. Six Towels .2s. — 9 —
To .11. pillowbeers — 11
To .6. Shifts at 1 18 6
To .6. white Aprons .18s. Seven . neck handkercheifs 10/6 1 8 6
To .17. Linnen .Caps 8s.6. ffourteen . headbands. 6s. — 14 6
To .3. Pocket handkercheifs .18d. one Trunke .8s — 9 6
To .1. old Chest 4s. one round Table .10s. — 14—
To .1. small cupboard 4s one small . Trunke. 18d — 5 6
To .1 pr. of small Andirons .4/6. one old warming pan 3/6 — 8—
To. 2. small brass kettles .15s. one small Ironpot & hookes .6/6 1 1 6
To .1. gridiron . 12d . one great wicker chair .7/6 — 8 6
To . 1. Close Stoole and a pan — 6 6
To .1. great elbow chaire . 2/6. one brass candlestick 15d. — 3 9
To .1. voyder . 18d. one Iron. fender. 12d — 3 6
To .1. old bedsteed — 3 —
To. 3. great pewter dishes and .20. small peicesof pewtr 2 16—
In debts by bills standing out 69——
To one halfe of the house which was formerly mr Joseph Winslows 67 ——
To .1. Spit. 2/6. one pr brass Scales .4/6 — 7 —
£200:09:09.
At mr John Winslows House
To .1. Long table and .6. joint Stooles. at 1 6—
To .1: pr. small brass Andirons — 16—
To .1. old cupboard .72. one pothanger Iron Skillet and one .pa. of Andirons. 9s. — 16—
To .9. Leather Chairs .362. one Bedsteed 6s 2 2 —
To. 1. standing cupboard .202. one great Chest. 10s 1 10 —
To .1. small table .82. two small bedsteeds. 2s — 10 —
To .3. chaires without Leathers .62. one pr. ffireIrons. 3/6. — 9 6
To . 1. Scotch. blanket .52. one pr. old stripedstuffe curtains— — 6 —
To .1. woosted Rugg .18s. one small ffeatherpillow .3s. 1 1 —
To .12. ps. of pewter and .6. plate 2 15 —
To .1. old Trunke— — 5 6
£212:11:9
Witness or hands
John Conney. Jarvis Ballard.
mr Jno Winslow and mr Richd Middlecott admitted Admrs. made oath in Court .22. Augt. 1679. to the truth of this Inventory and wn. more doth. appeare to discover it.
Jsa. Addington Cler.

Girls on the Mayflower
While much attention is focused on the men who came on the Mayflower, few people realize and take note that there were eleven girls on board, ranging in ages from less than a year old up to about sixteen or seventeen. William Bradford wrote that one of the Pilgrim's primary concerns was that the "weak bodies" of the women and girls would not be able to handle such a long voyage at sea, and the harsh life involved in establishing a new colony. For this reason, many girls were left behind, to be sent for later after the Colony had been established. Some of the daughters left behind include Fear Brewster (age 14), Mary Warren (10), Anna Warren (8), Sarah Warren (6), Elizabeth Warren (4), Abigail Warren (2), Jane Cooke (8), Hester Cooke (1), Mary Priest (7), Sarah Priest (5), and Elizabeth and Margaret Rogers.

As it would turn out however, the girls had the strongest bodies of them all. No girls died on the Mayflower's voyage, but one man and one boy did. And the terrible first winter, twenty-five men (50%) and eight boys (36%) got sick and died, compared to only two girls (16%).

So who were these girls? One of them was under the age of one, named Humility Cooper. Her father had died, and her mother was unable to support her; so she was sent with her aunt and uncle on the Mayflower. The other young girl, who was aged two, was Damaris Hopkins. She came with her parents Stephen and Elizabeth Hopkins, and step-brother and step-sister Giles and Constance.

Isaac and Mary Allerton brought their two daughters with them. Their youngest was Mary Allerton, at the age of four, and their oldest was Remember Allerton, at the age of six. Mary and Remember Allerton may have found playmates in Mary More, aged four, and Ellen More aged eight.

Mary and Ellen's story is a little more tragic than most girls on the Mayflower. Their parents Samuel and Katherine More were from a fairly wealthy family in Shropshire, England, and went through a most bitter separation and divorce. Realizing his children would be in social disgrace because of the divorce, and wanting to punish his wife for her extramarital affair with Jacob Blakeway (who Samuel found out was the biological father of "his" children), Samuel paid to have her children sent away on the Mayflower. It does not seem too surprising to learn that the abandoned Mary and Ellen More were the two girls that died the first winter, despite being adopted into respectable families among the Pilgrims.

As for the older girls on the Mayflower: Mary Chilton, Constance Hopkins, and Elizabeth Tilley were all aged thirteen; and no doubt became good friends with one another on the two month voyage of the Mayflower. By the age of thirteen, these girls would have helped their mothers with the cooking, sewing and laundering--but there really was little "women's work" to do on the Mayflower and much of the day was spent simply trying to pass time. The voyage was long--sixty six days--and there were many storms which shook the ship violently and forced everyone to stay below deck in cramped quarters; sea sickness was a continuous problem, and would have affected many of the girls.

Mary, Constance and Elizabeth probably spent some of their time trying to avoid the hyper, aggressive and bullying Francis Billington, the 14-year-old boy who could not stay out of trouble on the Mayflower. Once, Francis even got ahold of his father's gun and shot it off inside the Mayflower, sending sparks flying everywhere and starting a fire. Francis' family was no role-model either, as his father would later be hanged for murder, and his older brother would run away into the woods and be captured by the Nauset Indians. Boys John Hooke, Samuel Fuller, and John Cooke were also about their ages, and they probably knew each other fairly well.

On November 13, 1620, just four days after the Mayflower sighted land, the women were allowed on shore for the first time, to do the much-needed laundry. Mary, Constance, and Elizabeth would have come ashore near the tip of Cape Cod and helped their mothers do the wash. They were probably the first European females to set foot in New England since Freydis, the sister of Leif Ericsson. (Freydis was in America from about 1002 to 1006 AD, on an expedition from Greenland that she herself organized and financed--nearly 500 years before Christopher Columbus!)

Finally, two long months later, on December 12, 1620, the exploring party of men had found a suitable place to build their colony; and they sent for the Mayflower, which sailed over to Plymouth Harbor on the 15th. Legend has it that the first female ashore at Plymouth was Mary Chilton.

The oldest girls on the Mayflower were fifteen, and sixteen or seventeen years old, named Desire Minter and Priscilla Mullins. Desire's father William Minter had recently died, and her mother could no longer care for her daughter financially. The Minters belonged to the Pilgrims church in Leyden, so Desire came on the Mayflower with people she had known and grown up with her entire life--but her mother stayed behind in Leyden. Desire apparently caught the eye of a young man John Howland during the voyage. He was twenty at the time, and in a couple years they would both be at marrying age; but their relationship would not go very far, because Desire decided she didn't care much for America, got sick frequently, and returned to England within a few years. John Howland later married Elizabeth Tilley, mentioned above, and named his first daughter Desire.

Priscilla, the eldest girl on the Mayflower, came with her brother Joseph, and parents William and Alice. Priscilla had one little problem--she was the only girl approaching marriageable age on a ship with well over fifty young and single men--passengers and seamen alike. The Mayflower's cooper (barrel-maker), named John Alden, apparently won over Priscilla's heart--for he decided to stay in America rather than return home to England on the Mayflower. They were married a couple years later--a marriage which inspired the Henry Wadworth Longfellow poem, The Courtship of Myles.

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