Amos Gale Straw

b. 2 Feb 1864-Manchester, NH d. 13 Mar 1926-Carlisle, PA

Married 12 Nov 1901 to:

Zatae Leola Longsdorff

b. 16 Apr 1866-Carlisle, PA d. Oct 1955-Manchester, NH

Image of Zatae Longsdorff   Image of Zatae Longsdorff   Image of Zatae Longsdorff

~ ~ ~ Zatae Longsdorff ~ ~ ~


Their Family:


01. STRAW, Enid Constance b. 13 Jun 1900 d. 1981

02. STRAW, Zatae b. 16 Nov 1906-Manchester, NH d. 1929

03. STRAW, Wayne d. 1931

04. STRAW, David Gale b. 5 Feb 1923-Manchester, NH d. 25 Dec 1978 or 1979

Notes:

Amos Gale Straw:
1870 census Hillsborough, NH
Daniel F. Straw c1823
Lucretia c1830
Angie c1856
Amos K c1864
Lydia c1796 (mother)

1880 Census Place Manchester, Hillsborough, New Hampshire
Amos G. STRAW
Birth Year <1864>
Birthplace NH
Age 16
Occupation At School
Head of Household Daniel F. STRAW Relation Son
Father's Birthplace NH
Mother's Birthplace NH

1900 Manchester, Hillsborough NH
A. G. 1864
Gatac F. (Zatae) 1866
Enid 1900

He was a doctor; grad Dartmouth College 1887 with AB, 1890 with AM and grad Harvard Medical school in 1890. He was a surgeon with the 1st Regt, NHNG and on staff of Elliot Hospital in Manchester. (per Granite Monthly 1899; pub Concord, NH) He was living in Manchester, NH per Directory of former students of Harvard (1919)

other sources: IGI files
DOD POD per research of Ray and Mary Straw

Zatae Leola Longsdorff Straw:
She was a doctor also (grad Women's Medical College of Philadelphia in1887) She interned at Women's and Children's Hosp in Boston and then took charge of the Government Hospital at Fort Hall, Idaho. After this she returned and married and then practiced medicine in Manchester, NH. (Stearns)
Dar 108646 and research of Longsdorf@mdn.net

1930 census NH she is age 62; Enid is 29 and Zaeta Gale is 23; also there are two adopted sons: David and Wayne

Dickinson College Class of 1887:
Longsdorf (Straw), Zatae (1866-1955)

http://chronicles.dickinson.edu/encyclo/l/ed_longsdorffZ.html
Per Dickinson College Encyclopedia :
Zatae Longsdorff (Straw) (1866-1955)
Zatae Longsdorff was born on April 16, 1866, the second of six children of William Henry and Lydia R. Haverstick Longsdorff of Centerville, Pennsylvania, a few miles southwest of Carlisle. William Henry, a physician, was a Dickinson graduate of the class of 1856. Zatae’s brother, Harold, graduated from the College in 1879. Zatae continued the family tradition by graduating with the class of 1887, becoming the first female graduate of the College. She obtained a master's degree in cursu from Dickinson in 1890. Sisters Hildegarde (class of 1888), Jessica (class of 1891), and Persis (class of 1894) all attended Dickinson in turn. After graduation, Zatae pursued medical instruction at Women’s Medical College in Philadelphia, earning her degree in 1890. She served a year as an intern at the New England Hospital for Women and Children, and then relocated to a Native American reservation in Blackfoot, Idaho where she became the resident physician for a short time. A. Gale Straw and Zatae Longsdorff were married November 12, 1891, shortly after Zatae returned to the East. The couple had four children, and Zatae later resumed her medical practice at Elliot Hospital in Manchester, New Hampshire. A. Gale Straw died in 1926 after a long illness following his surgical service in the First World War. In 1924, Zatae won a seat in the New Hampshire State Legislature, going on to chair the House Committee on Public Health. She was chosen to preside over the Republican Party Convention in New Hampshire in 1926, making her the first woman in the United States to hold such a position. A later attempt to win a seat in the New Hampshire State Senate failed, but Zatae nonetheless continued to be politically active. She ultimately became the first woman president of the American Medical Society. For a lifetime of accomplishments, Zatae was awarded an honorary doctor of science degree by her alma mater in 1937, the 50th anniversary of her graduation from the College. Zatae Longsdorff Straw died on October 1, 1955 at her home in Manchester.

Zatae Longsdorff Straw papers, 1874-1952.

Zatae Longsdorff Straw (1866-1955) was the first woman graduate of Dickinson College as a member of the class of 1887; she went on to a successful career as a doctor and politician. The collection of her papers includes correspondence, printed and manuscript materials, scrapbooks and scrapbook materials, photographs, and artifacts. The bulk of the documents in this collection focuses on Zatae's life in Manchester, New Hampshire, both private and professional. There are some items, however, about her life at Dickinson, namely her dress and medal for the Pierson Prize in Oratory, 1886, and her writing desk.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH of ZATAE LONGSDORFF
Zatae Leola Sturgis Longsdorff was born on April 16, 1866, the eldest daughter and the second of six children of William Henry and Lydia R. Haverstick Longsdorff of Centerville, Pennsylvania, a few miles southwest of Carlisle. William Henry, a physician, was a Dickinson graduate of the class of 1856. Zatae's brother, Harold, graduated from the College in 1879. Zatae, having been educated in area schools, entered Wellesley College in 1883. However, when Dickinson first allowed female students to attend in 1884, Zatae and her sister Hildegarde enrolled. Graduating with the class of 1887, the eldest Longsdorff girl became the first female graduate of the College; she obtained a master's degree in cursu from Dickinson in 1890. Sisters Hildegarde (class of 1888), Jessica (class of 1891), and Persis (class of 1894) all attended Dickinson in turn.

After graduation, Zatae pursued medical instruction at Women's Medical College in Philadelphia, earning her medical degree in 1890. She served a year as an intern at the New England Hospital for Women and Children, and then relocated to a Native American reservation in Blackfoot, Idaho where she became the resident physician for a short time.

Amos Gale Straw and Zatae Longsdorff were married November 12, 1891, shortly after she returned to the eastern U.S.; the couple settled in Manchester, New Hampshire. They had four children (Enid, Zatae Gale, David, Wayne), and also raised Gertrude Grey as their foster daughter. Longsdorff later resumed her medical practice at Elliot Hospital in Manchester. In addition to her thriving practice, she was very involved in the community as a member of the American Legion Auxiliary, the PTA, and the Daughters of the American Revolution. She would serve as state president of the American Legion Auxiliary for the year 1935-1936.

In her later years, Longsdorff became active in New Hampshire politics. In 1923 she became the first woman to preside over a state Republican convention. A year later she was elected to the New Hampshire State House of Representatives, and was elected to a second term in 1926. Serving on the Committee on Public Health, she became its chairperson during this second term; she also served on the Committee on Fisheries and Game, being an avid hunter and fisher herself. She ran unsuccessfully for a seat in the New Hampshire State Senate in 1928. However, this high point in Longsdorff's public life was marred by personal tragedy. Her mother, Lydia Haverstick, died in 1921, having outlived her husband by 16 years. Amos Gale Straw died in 1926 after a long illness resulting from his surgical service in the First World War. In 1929, the youngest daughter, Zatae Gale, died shortly after graduating from Brown University, and a year later son Wayne drowned. Still, Zatae Longsdorff maintained her public profile and continued with her medical practice. Her daughter Enid graduated from Wellesley College in 1921, and in 1937 she married Dean Chamberlin. Son David continued to live in Manchester, and Gertrude remained at home with her foster mother.

Longsdorff ultimately became the first woman president of the American Medical Society. In 1941, she was honored by the New Hampshire Medical Society for a half-century of service in the medical field. For her lifetime of accomplishments, Longsdorff was awarded an honorary doctor of science degree by her alma mater in 1937, the 50th anniversary of her graduation from Dickinson College.

New Hampshire Women Legislators
1921 - 1971
Prepared by Leon B. Anderson

Mrs. Straw, native of Centerville, Pa., became the first woman graduate of Dickinson College in 1887, while youngest of her class. Three years later she became a physician, and the following year she married Dr. A. Gale Straw of Manchester, who died in 1919 from ill health brought on by arduous overseas service through World War 1.

Mrs. Straw was ever outspoken and fearless. While guest at a reception for Governor Charles W. Tobey, Dr. Straw denounced smoking by women, and berated the "flappers" for their tight and short dresses. She battled in vain to outlaw cosmetics, as chairman of the House Public Health Committee. She also served with vim and vigor on the Fisheries and Game Committee, as an ardent member of the Izaak Walton League of America.

Enid Constance Straw:
See notes above on mother and father

Zatae Straw:
See notes above on mother

Wayne C. Straw:
Adopted son of Amos and Zatae Straw

David Gale Straw:
Adopted son of Amos and Zatae Straw

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