Captain Bartholomew Carek Kindred

b. 20 Apr 1818-Jackson, IN d. 13 Mar 1904-Warrenton, OR

Married on 26 Aug 1841 in Davies County, MO to:

Rachel Mylar

b. 14 Mar 1822-Madison, KY d. 2 Jan 1898-Hammond, OR

Image of Bartholomew & Rachel Kindred

Bartholomew & Rachel Mylar Kindred


Children of Bartholomew & Rachel Kindred:

#

Name

DOB/Place of Birth

DOD/Place of Death

01
KINDRED, Henry Patterson
b. 15 July 1842-Davis County, MO
4 Apr 1926-Astoria, OR
02
KINDRED, James Franklin
b. 24 Dec 1844-Oregon City, OR
25 May 1917-Warrenton, OR
03
KINDRED, Joel
b. 15 Jun 1847-Clatsop County, OR
2 Dec 1864-Clatsop Plains, OR
04
KINDRED, Nancy
b. 21 May 1849-Clatsop County, OR
?-Portland, OR
05
KINDRED, Julia
b. 12 Mar 1851-Clatsop County, OR
1906-Portland, OR
06
KINDRED, Mary
b. 9 Mar 1853-Clatsop County, OR
?
07
KINDRED, Amelia
b. 28 Mar 1855-
?
08
KINDRED, William Stingly . . . .
b. 20 Oct 1857-, Clatsop, OR
Oct 1943-Tokeland, , WA
09
KINDRED, Amanda
b. 1 Mar 1860-Clatsop County, OR
d. 1916-CA
10
KINDRED, David Clark
b. 15 Aug 1862-Clatsop County, OR
d. 26 Apr 1921-Astoria, OR
11
KINDRED, Roseta
b. 6 Feb 1865-Clatsop County, OR
d. ?
12
KINDRED, Sarah
b. 22 Dec 1867-Clatsop County, OR . . .
d. ?

Notes:

Bartholomew Carek Kindred, was born in Jackson County Indiana on April 20, 1818, and when he was fourteen years old his parents moved to Iowa and located on the Skunk River. There they farmed until 1837. That year the family moved overland to Missouri where on August 26, 1841 Bartholomew married a great grandniece of the celebrated Daniel Boone, Rachel Mylar. Rachel was born in Madison County Kentucky on March 14, 1822 and moved to Missouri with her parents as a young girl.

Bartholomew and Rachel with their young son who later became known as Captain Henry Patterson Kindred (born in Davis County, Missouri on July 15, 1842) started west with the Gilliam Company in 1844. They arrived at the Willamette River, across from Lake Oswego on Christmas eve of 1844. There they pitched their tent and unloaded their scanty provisions. Late that evening (Christmas eve) Rachel gave birth to their second son (her first Christmas gift in Oregon) whom they named James Franklin. The first white child born in Oregon City in the home of Dr. McLaughlin which is now an historical museum.

Because of a sickness epidemic, the following year B. C. Kindred and his family moved from their first Oregon location down the Columbia River to Cathlamet, Washington where he worked in Hunt’s Logging and Milling operation until 1845. Then the family proceeded down river to Clatsop where they bought the improvement on the land now known as Gearheart Park (the town of Gearheart)from Mr. Jerry Tulles for which they paid one yolk of oxen. On New Year’s Eve the family reached Captain R. W. Morrison’s on Clatsop Plains where they remained for a few days and then moved into their new home, a little log cabin, 10' x 12'. Here they resided until November of 1864 when they sold their improvements to a Mr. Motley, and moved upon their Donation Land Claim of half a section of land where Hammond now stands (called Kindred Addition.) Here their third son, Joel, was born who was later killed while hunting on the plains.

In 1850 they added another half section to their claim (Kindred Park.) Here Rachel began in earnest to assist her husband in building their future home in the midst of a large settlement of Indians whose burial grounds were near by. She helped to nurse the Indians through an epidemic of small pox and as a result, the tribal chiefs placed a white flag upon the Kindred home which signified that no harm should befall their family. To Mrs. Kindred, these were days long to be remembered with three small children, one a babe, and only two or three white families for miles around.

Captain Bartholomew C. Kindred was the first man to operate boats on the Columbia and Willamette Rivers. He carried freight from Tansy Point (Flavel) to Oregon City in Indian canoes from 1845 to 1850. Later he navigated scows and sailing sloops between the mouth of the Columbia River and Fort Vancouver, and Oregon City. When the wind failed to propel his boat, passengers who had paid a fee of about $20.00 for the trip that usually required a week or more, would break out the oars and row. Captain “Bart” and his son, Captain Henry, have the honor of being the first commercial navigators and pilots on the Columbia River and Bar. This occupation has been carried on up to the present day by direct descendants of the pioneer, two grandsons of the first river pilot, Captain Walter Bartholomew Matheson, Chairman of the Oregon State Pilots Commission, and Captain Wilbert W. Babbidge, both born and raised in the Columbia River Country. In 1963 they were piloting the ocean-going vessels that entered the river from all parts of the world.

When the transportation business became no longer profitable for him, B. C. Kindred embarked in other enterprises. The principal ones of which were fishing, farming, real estate, and the suppling of fresh provisions to sailing ships that would anchor off the shores of their homestead (Tansy Point) upon arrival and before departing for sea.

Mrs. B. C. Kindred sold her half of their donation land claim (320 acres) to a syndicate for $25,000.00. It was platted and named New Astoria. Mr. Kindred sold a portion of his claim to the U. S. Government for $35,000.00 for the establishment of the Federal fortification at Point Adams which was completed and christened in 1864 as Fort Steven to honor General Isaac J. Stevens, first governor of Washington Territory and which garrisoned regulars sent from California.

Captain “Bart who was a sound money republican, retired from active business in 1890, and he and his wife spent the remainder of their memorable years in their home situated on their donation land claim. The house still stands though it has been moved closer to the highway in Warrenton, east side toward Astoria.

Mrs. Kindred died on January 2, 1898. Captain Kindred died on March 13, 1904. Both were buried in the Pioneer Cemetery on Clatsop Plains.

Apparently, Bartholomeew & Rachel had 13 children, but in researching, not all of them have been found.

Rachel Kindred:

Rachel Mylar was a great grandniece of the celebrated Daniel Boone. While a young girl she moved to Missouri with her parents. At the age of 19 on August 26, 1841 she married Bartholomew Carek Kindred. July 15, 1842 she gave birth to a son, Henry Patterson, in Davis County Missouri. In 1844 they and Bartholomew's parents started west from Gilliam County Missouri joining the emigrant company headed by Colonel Cornelius Gilliam.

For Rachel Kindred the trek west oftentimes took on the nature of a nightmare. They suffered intensely from various causes. Bartholomew’s team of oxen became exhausted before reaching the summit of the Blue Mountains in Eastern Oregon and Rachel was compelled to complete her journey on foot. Her shoes and stockings soon gave out and her clothing became thin and ragged. Thus, with bare feet, bruised and swollen, she toiled on always preparing meals and assisting her husband in every way possible. They walked around the portage of the Cascades late in December, and their long, tedious journey was completed on December 24, 1844. They reached a point on the Willamette River opposite Lake Oswego. There they pitched their tent and unloaded their scanty provisions. Late that evening (Christmas eve) Rachel gave birth to their second son (her first Christmas gift in Oregon) whom they named James Franklin. The first white child born in Oregon City in the home of Dr. McLaughlin which is now an historical museum.

After several moves, they proceeded down river to Clatsop where they bought the improvement on the land now known as Gearheart Park (the town of Gearheart) for which they paid one yolk of oxen. In early 1846 they moved into their new home, a little log cabin, 10' x 12'. Here they resided until November of 1864 when they sold their improvements and moved upon their Donation Land Claim of half a section of land where Hammond now stands. In 1850 they added another half section to their claim. Here Rachel began in earnest to assist her husband in building their future home in the midst of a large settlement of Indians whose burial grounds were near by. She helped to nurse the Indians through an epidemic of small pox and as a result, the tribal chiefs placed a white flag upon the Kindred home which signified that no harm should befall their family.

Rachel was strong and resourceful. She could use a musket as well as any man, and was known to yield a red-hot poker on occasion. When the schooner “Woodpecker” was wrecked on Clatsop Spit (the south side of the Mouth of Columbia) on May 10, 1861 the settlers set about to salvage the cargo of flour then valued at $12.00 a barrel. As the water was breaking over the ship most of the time, they could only work during the last part of the ebb tide. The storm was so bad the second day, the men and boys took refuge in Tansy Creek after having secured seven sacks of flour. Rachel became worried about her husband and sons and went down to the beach, but was unable to find them. In the meantime, the flood tide broke up the deck of the ship and out floated the entire cargo so that she could see what looked like a large flock of white birds. The tide was bringing the cargo ashore. Without hesitation, she removed unnecessary clothing and waded in, met the incoming sacks of flour, and brought them ashore. Hour after hour passed, but she was so stimulated by her success that she felt no fatigue. When the men landed with their seven sacks of flour, they found she had 360 sacks stacked on the beach — and she was still watching for any stray sacks that might come within her reach. The water hadn’t penetrated far into the sacks, but it took many days to sift the salvaged cargo so it could be stored.

From the Daily Astorian 12 Sep 1897, p. 7 in a sketch of Mrs. Rachel Mylar Kindred, speaking of her son James Kindred: "At the death of his first wife he gave his mother his baby girl, Gussie. Mrs. Kindred has reared her from babyhood. She is now a strong, healthy woman, and is a devoted and loving grand-daughter."


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